Data and a Polygraph: A Look into Data Journalism

As the uses and values of data become more well-known, more and more unique ways of exploring and presenting data are emerging to the forefront of the Internet. When Wesleyan invited one of these explorers, Matt Daniels, to give a talk on data journalism and media art, I immediately dug into his portfolio. Daniels hosts his projects on a website called Polygraph, and currently has only focused one exploring data related to music. I was immediately transfixed by the name of his site – polygraph isn’t a word commonly connected to data or information – and, due to blanking on the definition, Googled it. I found the following:

pol·y·graph [ˈpälēˌɡraf]


  1. A machine designed to detect and record changes in physiological characteristics, such as a person’s pulse and breathing rates, used especially as a lie detector.

With this definition swirling in my head, I came to Daniels’ talk eager to learn what he was all about. Daniels, one of the many young creators who are storming the tech industry, began by clicking to a slide of the visualization that made him “internet famous.” He describes that the goal of this project was to look at the usage of unique words by rappers in their songs. The visualization charts these usages, along with the amount of unique words used by authors ranging from Shakespeare to Melville. The visualization was then followed by some text that further fleshed out what he had discovered. And there you find Daniel’s formula, the foundation of this data journalism he has fallen into: a code narrative + a prose narrative = an interesting and interactive read.

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Introducing: The Data Analysis Minor

The Quantitative Analysis Center has always had the goal of bringing together students from across different departments and disciplines through the art of data analysis. While data and quantitative analysis can be connected only to work in math and computer science, it is really a broad skill set that can complement work done in economics, psychology, sociology, English, and much more.

Pride yourself on wheedling down a chaotic data set? Enjoy making snazzy graphs? Love seeing stories unfold from visualizations? Finally, there is now a way to officially bring together the QAC’s programs and your main major. With the QAC Data Analysis Minor, these skills can officially be declared as a part of your college education. Overall, this five course minor requires one basic knowledge course; two courses that are either mathematical, statistical, or computing foundation courses; and two applied electives. Not bad, eh?

I know what you’re thinking. Finally there is a way to learn how to master messy data and make snazzy graphs and get credit for it on your college diploma. So what are you waiting for? Acquire this awesome skill set, enter the world of the QAC, and declare your data analysis minor today!

Don’t Count Data Out: A Conversation with Dana Louie ‘14

When I mention that I’m taking classes in the QAC department, I’m often met with blinking eyes and blank stares. Few people know what it is, or if they do they ask something along the lines of: “Oh, that <em>data</em> thing?” They say data like it’s some sort of disease that is not understandable or conquerable.

Data is far from a disease, but it <em>is</em> capable of spreading everywhere. Data are not static numbers on a screen; data are what is behind your favorite <em>New York Times</em> article. Data is extremely customizable and manipulatable and, most importantly, for everyone.

Despite those who have never heard of the QAC before, the department has been running at Wesleyan for years, and many now graduated students stumbled their way into their first QAC class only to leave with a career in data analysis. One of those students is Dana Louie ’14, who I had the pleasure of chatting to when she came to campus to give an info session for Analysis Group, the firm she works for. Dana’s discovery of the QAC happened through the QAC summer program, where she took classes in morning and then worked on research with professor in the afternoon. The following year, she was selected to be QAC tutor, and her fate in the department was sealed.

“People can succeed [in QAC classes] even with no background,” Dana said confidently, referring to the fear that keeps a lot of students from getting off the bench and entering the world of the QAC. When talking with my friends about by own experiences in the QAC, they often say something along the lines of “Wow, that sounds really cool. I wish I could do that.” I always respond with “You can,” just as Dana as saying. There are many intro classes in the QAC (QAC201, QAC211), and many chances to start to learn one of the programming languages.

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Data Analysis Beyond the QAC: A Conversation with Zach ’15 and Sanvir ‘15

Do you ever wonder how the fascinating theories you’re learning at Wesleyan might help you get a job after graduation? It’s so easy to be romanced by Wesleyan’s niche majors and broad-based interdisciplinary options. And that’s how it should be – you should definitely take advantage of that eye-opening class on Race &amp; Medicine and those lectures on the origins of medieval eastern-European dance. But as Aunt Mildred and Uncle Al like to remind you at family reunions, knowing a lot about the political history of the Sung Dynasty isn’t enough to get you a job.

That’s where QAC comes in. As the QAC web site explains, QAC “coordinates support for quantitative analysis across the curriculum, and provides an institutional framework for collaboration across departments and disciplines.” Putting it another way, data analysis skills combine beautifully with the critical thinking skills and broad-based theories you’re learning in your other classes, and open the door to research and employment opportunities across a wide spectrum of fields. “Irrespective of your major, you can do data analysis work to help you with whatever you’re doing,” Sanvir ’15 pointed out. “If you really look into it, you can do something with data to make your work more interesting. An example would be English word mapping.”

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